Old Tears: a Prompt

 

Romeo_JulietFor years now I’ve been using writing prompts to help spark some creativity and to just plain have some fun with.  The idea is you take some random objects or lines of text (usually from a deck of prompt cards or lines from a writers website) and write for ten minutes without stopping to edit. Here’s one. 
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My Kingdom for a Course

 

BPER_-_Cassaforte_bancaria

Klick Me

 

Last week I read an article from The Atlantic about how MFA programs don’t do squat  (spoiler: science people used computers to find the answer) and I got to thinking about writing a piece about MFAs.  After all, at one time or another, a young writer has to make the decision to MFA or not to MFA.   Continue reading

The Poet and the Work

 

Mel

Click me

 

“Poets, in order to live, must often die, and shed not only the red blood of their hearts, but the white blood of their souls that flows and leaves traces which can be followed.  That is the price of applause.  Poets must give their all in order to obtain the slightest approval…The poet’s work detests and devours him.  There isn’t room for both the poet and his work.  The work profits from the poet.  Only after his death can the poet profit from the work.  And anyway, the public prefer dead poets and they are right.  A poet who isn’t dead is an anachronism.”           — Jean Cocteau

Catty Corner

cats

 

For years now I’ve been using writing prompts to help spark some creativity and to just plain have some fun with.  The idea is you take some random objects or lines of text (usually from a deck of prompt cards or lines from a writers website) and write for ten minutes without stopping to edit. Here’s one.  Continue reading

Book Review: Mann’s ‘Death in Venice and Other Tales’

Mann

Buy me!

This book is a collection of his some of Thomas Mann’s most popular short stories.  For the most part, I don’t care for short stories.  I’m a marathon man when it comes to my literature.  I lace up the shoes, I do my stretches, and run with the novelist.  I know it’ll be a long run, so I don’t burn myself out.  I take my breaks so I don’t hit my walls, but I recover.  With short stories, you’re off and then you’re done, leaving sometimes dizzy-headed and wondering what happened.  In a short story, you have less space to play with, and the pace and development time and so you have a lack of true character development to get into anything really deep or revealing in human nature. They deal with short scenes, revelations, epiphanies, and the such.   Continue reading